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20110709
20110709
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
have expanded radically with involvement in afghanistan and iraq. as we will hear, the u.s. as crated a police force in iraq that may number as many as 400,000 personnel. the goal of the u.s.-led nato training effort is at 157,000 police and the cost of this training program to the u.s. alone is about $1 billion per month. today, police assistance programs in the government are in multibillion-dollar effort led by the departments of defense and the department state but involving a number of other federal agencies. as programs have grown in size and cost, they also grow in kind. as you saw from the exhibition here on the screen, policing around the world is heavily impacted by history, culture, legal systems, and level of development. police forces differ markedly, so do they differ by agency and the country in which they work in. today, we have assembled a panel of very distinguished experts to discuss the various approaches that the u.s. government takes towards police training in foreign countries. you have the bad reviews for our speakers, so i will not do that. the speakers will c
into the fight for afghanistan today. he landed there hours ago promising to take the fight to al qaeda. he says since killing osama bin laden, quote, we have them on the run, end quote. panetta says by applying maximum pressure, we can cripple al qaeda as a threat to this country. >>> the dalai lama is in washington, d.c. today beginning a ten-day spiritual ritual. with thousands gathered on the west lawn of the u.s. capitol, the leader of the tibetan buddhism discussed the importance of individual peace of mind and offered a personal perspective. >> i lost my own freedom at the age of 16. then i lost my own country. a lot of difficulties and a lot of responsibilities. however, i think comparatively, i can sustain peace of mind. >> the chinese government is taking a dim view of the dalai lama's visit to the nation's capital. it dismissed him as a political exile engaging in tibetan separatist activities under the guise of religion. >>> and now off to london where the skandized "news of the world" tabloid is getting ready to shut its doors for good. the final edition of the best-selling tabloid
is a testament to that, afghanistan, somalia, all of the other countries that have been attacked by the united states and nato have never, ever roar recovered. how can it be humanitarian when you're costing people their lives. >> it was organized by the answer coalition, the american muslim alliance and several other groups. >>> it strikes younger women and african-american women in greater numbers. and none of the cancer drugs currently on the market have any effect on it. fighting triple-negative breast cancer has been a challenge for cancer researchers, but now there may be an answer, a breakthrough at the university of maryland's greenbaum cancer center is is the ubt of a buddy check 9 report. here is andrea. >> reporter: evelyn david is about to celebrate another birthday, her 33rd. >> we're having a barbecue, it's called the second chance at life for barbecue. >> reporter: evelyn was diagnosed with early stage breast cancer in 2009. >> i couldn't breathe when she told me i had breast cancer. >> reporter: you now have triple-negative breast cancer. >> that i almost lost my mind. >> repor
trove of documents that have been released in the last year. the iraq war logs, the afghanistan war logs, and what has been called cablegate, as the u.s. state department documents that are continuing to be released. why does it matter so much? we will talk about that this afternoon, but let's just take one example that came out in the iraq war logs. february 2007. the war log show that to give you zero men were standing, iraqis under an apache helicopter. the men have their hands up. they clearly are attempting to surrender. the apache helicopter can see this. so they are not wrote. the soldiers called back to the base and asked what they should do. the lawyer in the bass says you cannot surrender to a helicopter, and they blow the man attempting to surrender away. that was february 2007. now, we will fast forward to july 12, 2007. video that has been released by wikileaks. this devastating video of an area of baghdad where a group of men were showing around two reuters journalists. one was an up-and-coming videographer, and one was this driver. he was 40 years old, father of four. they
or afghanistan and murdoch would not have tolerated it. >> when you think about -- i'm sorry about that. when you think about what one done and the depesble things that were done, do you think he made the right call of canceling it, it's done? >> it's a difficult call because as you said it's an old, historic paper, that has a great history, but has committed abuses in the past like all tabloids do, but also exposed a lot of fraud and misdeeds, most recently exposed corruption in the pakistani cricket team which was an important story. it's very sad and it's sad for the 200 people who work there, frightful for them. many of them will be given jobs in other news of murdoch's papers in london. he probably will create a new sunday paper called "the sun on sunday" to go along with his daily paper "the sun" which is another tabloid in britain. >> mr. shawcross, some were wondering, i was reading a lot of articles on this, if rupert murdoch was at all responsible, maybe in a trickled down effect, of kind of creating an atmosphere where people will be willing to do anything to get that story. who create
phillipson just found out his son james who died in afghanistan in 2006 may have had his cell phone tapped into by the news of the world and also his e-mail. >> they hacked into a dead soldier. it is despicable. what else can you say? what on earth do they think they were going to find? >> reporter: in word of the prime minister, people trust the police to wrote tect them, politicians to represent them and the press to inform them. and, he says, the british public has been failed by all three. alex, just to explain why some people are so upset by this is alleged, for example, a missing 13-year-old girl had her mobile phone hacked into, voice mails left by her parents listened to by a private detective and even some voice mails deleted to make space so more voice mails could be left. that's why this scandal is threatening to change the nature of the tabloid press in this country. >> well, that action is obscene. it looks like they will pay for that one. thank you, keir simmons. >>> from a runaway boat to a runaway horse, here are stories you missed from the week. a scene from "the mummy." o
of bereeved relatives of soldiers that had died in afghanistan, iraq and indeed very seriously they had approved the -- the senior members had approved payments to members of the police. so this has exploded this week into a scandal that has changed the landscape of both politics and media in the united kingdom. host: yesterday, "the guardian" newspaper has a picture of andy coltson. who is he? guest: he was the editor from 2003 to 2007. a period when many of these hacks were alleged to have taken place. in 2007 he stepped down from "news of the world" after this scandal first came to light. indeed after the correspondent had gone to jail over allegations of hacking the royal households phones. but he then went to work for david cam ran, the prime minister and he stepped down from this post as this story continued to rumble at the very beginning of this year. yesterday he presented himself for arrest at a london police station. he was released in the afternoon. his house was raided. he was questioned and he is now a very central figure in that investigation. he's also very central figur
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)